THOMAS J. GARLAND LIBRARY    

 

 

 

    

 

       Vol. XXIII, no. 4 THE THOMAS J. GARLAND LIBRARY Summer Extra 2013

 

 

This  number of the library newsletter offers our summer hours and a recap of our service statistics for the school year with some assessment.  Because of a desire to include database vendor statistics, we are a couple of weeks late in publishing this and so have changed the edition name to the Summer Extra.

 

Library Hours:

 

Greeneville Campus
Summer Hours
May 13 - August 18, 2013

Monday -Thursday  8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Friday  8:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m.
Saturday, Sunday  Closed

*Schedule may change without notice.  Please call 423-636-7320 to confirm open hours.

Thursday-Friday, July 4-5, 2013  Closed Independence Day Holiday

Knoxville Regional Center

Summer Hours
May 20-August 3, 2013

Monday—Thursday 9:00 am - 7:00 pm
 Friday  12:00 pm - 6:00 pm
 Saturday and Sunday Closed

*Schedule may change without notice. Please call 865-693-1177 ext. 5035 to confirm hours.

Thursday-Friday, July 4-5, 2013  Closed Independence Day Holiday

 


  

Service Statistics:

 

  

YTD Use Statistics (July through May 2012- 2013): 

 

Greeneville

Knoxville

 Physical Use

 

 

In House Patrons

43,381

17,087

Days Open

270

258

Average Daily Attendance

160.67

66.23

Circulation

 

 

Books

1,358

146

Periodicals

na

45

Reserves

25

352

Media

182

100

Ebooks

netlibrary 11,283
Ebrary 2,224

 G-K e-bks combined

Reference

 

 

In House

3,135

1,132

Phone

DE  35
Residential:  507

314

Email

DE 47

Residential 32

130

TOTAL

3,796

1,491

Library Instruction Sessions

 

 

DE

56

88

Residential

107

 

 Website (library only) Visits: 34,817; Subscription database searches (total): 693,088; Total electronic visits to  the Thomas J. Garland  Library : 727,905.

 

Interlibrary Loans:

Greeneville to Knoxville, 15;  Knoxville to Greeneville, 5; via OCLC from other libraries for both campuses, 120;  Inhouse computer logins by community patrons (Greeneville campus): 292; Books by mail: 0.

 

 

Total Database Searches by Vendor, July 1, 2012-May  31, 2013:

With figures for the period all in hand simultaneously from our various vendors, we are happy to be able to provide this breakdown of database use for titles exclusive of e-books, e.g., Ebrary. Please keep in mind that vendor names often include more than one named database.  For example, ProQuest Central = 12 separate databases for business, e.g., ABI Inform; 9 separate databases for Health and Medicine, e.g., Proquest Nursing and Allied Health; 10 databases for Social Sciences, e.g., ProQuest Education or ProQuest Criminal Justice; 9 databases in Science and Technology, e.g., ProQuest Computing; and 3-4 each in the disciplines of Art, Literature, and History. Figures given are for vendor use as a  whole; reporting is not yet sophisticated enough to report by named database.  InfoTRAC 1, by the way, is our local name for TEL, the Tennessee Electronic Library, while InfoTRAC 2 represents the Gale databases we purchase by subscription.

 

 

 

Database Searches 2012-2013

 

                       
                             
  July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May           YTD  
                             
InfoTRAC 1

31,714

38,813

39,522

67,717

59,171

35,844

41,838

41,176

38,586

41,169

24,572

 

460,122

 
InfoTRAC 2

968

1,293

1,037

726

654

882

1,198

2,943

1,282

2,022

1,204

 

14,209

 
EBSCOhost

6,898

14,743

16,392

10,729

11,808

6,359

10,826

14,029

18,673

13,261

5,923

 

129,641

 
Pro Quest

4,636

5,448

8,577

8,306

5,740

8,750

3,760

5,640

6,915

6,917

3,375

 

68,064

 
JSTOR

363

490

1,304

1,194

1,228

594

672

873

752

1,086

245

 

8,801

 
Lexis-Nexis

446

394

464

364

475

209

240

350

317

340

NA

 

3,599

 
ArtSTOR

3

3

390

651

152

0

89

6

30

24

5

 

1,353

 
CQ Researcher

112

108

115

225

68

33

105

151

101

98

113

 

1,229

 
Oxford                            

Grove Art

1

33

82

0

36

1

12

2

26

4

9

 

206

 

Grove Music

4

0

0

 

1

2

5

4

5

4

2

 

27

 
TOTAL Oxford

5

33

82

0

37

3

17

6

31

8

11

 

233

 
CREDO Ref

73

135

96

128

86

32

255

207

55

257

47

 

1,371

 
Project MUSE

122

18

114

83

38

15

19

65

37

37

NA

 

548

 
Alexander St. Press

9

5

29

57

88

32

23

8

12

31

NA

 

294

 
Evans/Newsbank

119

12

11

7

2

0

17

12

13

4

10

 

207

 
Polling the Nations

8

20

13

21

11

3

15

18

9

14

28

 

160

 
Statesman's Yearbook**

38

73

102

144

60

13

39

80

119

76

81

 

825

 
Standard & Poor's

254

54

624

46

193

134

314

424

110

39

7

 

825

 
                             

TOTAL:

45,773

61,675

68,954

90,398

79,848

52,906

59,444

65,994

67,073

65,391

35,632

 

693,088

 
                             
*Figures for this database are culumative for all ACA schools. Individual figures are not available at this time.    

 

Assessment of Key Statistics:

Information literacy/library orientation sessions: Library orientation and Information Literacy instruction continued to hold a prominent place in library service during 2012-2013. A total of 251 sessions were held through May 2013. All were conducted in direct association with teaching faculty and continue to be enhanced through the further collaboration of Information Literacy with faculty committees. As a result of library outreach beyond the class sessions,  librarians  also met  and worked with students individually  during scheduled research appointments further enhancing student learning.

 

Circulation: In a further demonstration of the growing popularity and acceptance of the format, many more  electronic books (13,507) were circulated than print (1,504). Ease of access and use  are factors (no need to physically check out the book added to key word searching features) in the continuing success of the format.

 

 

Electronic visits: Electronic visits to the Garland Library during the 2012-2013 reporting period to date have again well passed the half million mark. This figure largely explains the decline in print book and journal circulation and follows the general national format trend.  

 

      

 


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